PRESENT AND FUTURE OF RECOMBINANT VACCINE TECHNOLOGIES

  • Catalina Daniela STAN “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Maria DRAGAN “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Gabriela TATARINGA “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • C.I. STAN “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • ANDREEA LETITIA ARSENE “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucuresti, Romania
  • Cornelia MIRCEA “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Abstract

Vaccination still has the potential to make a bigger contribution to global health. The routine uses in industrialized countries of hepatitis B and human papillomavirus vaccines successfully marked the prevention of liver and cervical cancer, is a very good example. All technological and scientific acquisitions in recombinant DNA technology over the last few years have resulted in new vaccines, thus making vaccination available to an increasing number of patients. Some recombinant vaccines have been already approved for medical use and others are in different stages of preclinical or clinical evaluation. Nowadays, novel approaches are being explored, such as: reverse vaccinology, bioconjugation technology, the use of generalized modules for membrane antigens and the use of RNA vaccines. By modifying the genome of the agents of infectious diseases new vaccines, safer, more effective, lower cost and convenient delivery, will emerge.

Author Biographies

Catalina Daniela STAN, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Pharmacy
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences II

Maria DRAGAN, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Pharmacy
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences II

Gabriela TATARINGA, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Pharmacy
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences I

C.I. STAN, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Morpho functional Sciences (I)

ANDREEA LETITIA ARSENE, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucuresti, Romania

Faculty of Pharmacy
Department of General and Pharmaceutical Microbiology

Cornelia MIRCEA, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Pharmacy
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences II

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Published
2018-06-30