ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS IN CHILDREN. CURRENT EPIDEMIO-LOGICAL AND ETIOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS

  • Mihaela MIHAI “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Alina MANOLE “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Aurica RUGINA “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • M. MANOLE “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Violeta STREANGA “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Dana Elena MINDRU “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Abstract

ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS IN CHILDREN. CURRENT EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND ETIOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS (Abstract): Acute diarrheal disease ranks second among the causes of specific morbidity (after respiratory infections) with higher incidence values in economically undeveloped or developing countries (3 to 7 episodes of diarrhea / year / child compared to only 1-2 episodes / year / child in highly industrialized countries). Infection with Campylobacter globally was the most frequently reported zooanthroponosis, with 214,268 confirmed human cases in 2012. Almost any pathogen involved in the etiology of acute diarrheal disease may be involved in the occurrence of healthcare-associated infections; among these, the rotavirus and Clostridium difficile are most prevalent. General hygiene measures change the epidemiological aspect of acute diarrheal disease by modifying the factors which favor the transmission of pathogens.

Author Biographies

Mihaela MIHAI, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Preventive Medicine and Interdisciplinarity

Alina MANOLE, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Preventive Medicine and Interdisciplinarity

Aurica RUGINA, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Mother and Child Medicine

M. MANOLE, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Preventive Medicine and Interdisciplinarity

Violeta STREANGA, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Mother and Child Medicine

Dana Elena MINDRU, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Mother and Child Medicine

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Published
2018-10-04
Section
PREVENTIVE MEDICINE - LABORATORY