CONTRIBUTION OF IMMUNIZATION AGAINST STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE AND HEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE TYPE B IN REDUCING PEDIATRIC RESPIRATORY MORBIDITY

  • Otilia NOVAC “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Liliana BARBACARIU “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Ana Maria SLANINA “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Otilia Elena FRASINARIU “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Laura Mihaela TRANDAFIR “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Abstract

Aim: To highlights the peculiarities of acute respiratory infections and the possible complications in vaccinated children compared with unvaccinated children. Material and methods: This retrospective study included 346 patients aged 1 to 6 years, followed in a general practitioner center from an urban area. The cohort study was analyzed for immunizations and severe respiratory pathology requiring hospitalization or antibiotic therapy until the time of study. Results: Out of the 346 children surveyed, 20 (5.78%) presented ARI, according to the criteria we initially set for the selection, 21 (6.06%) presented otitis, 11 (3.17%) were hospitalized for respiratory tract infections, while 84.97% did not experience complicated respiratory pathology. In the age group 1-2 years old, from the 58 children vaccinated against Hib, but not against S. pneumoniae, 46 did not show severe respiratory pathology (79.31%), while the remaining 12 children (20.68%) recorded hospitalizations, otitis and respiratory infections that required antibiotic treatments. Of the 37 children aged 2-3 years, who were vaccinated against Hib, but not against S. pneumoniae, 32 did not have severe respiratory pathology (86.48%) and 5 children (13.51%) have a higher susceptibility. The distribution of 346 children according to respiratory pathology and vaccines showed that approximately 83% of non-vaccinated children developed respiratory pathology, while this pathology was present in less than 15% of the vaccinated children (p=0.001). Conclusions: We concluded that respiratory pathology was more prevalent in unvaccinated children comparing to vaccinated children.

Author Biographies

Otilia NOVAC, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Department of Preventive Medicine and Interdisciplinarity

Liliana BARBACARIU, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Department of Preventive Medicine and Interdisciplinarity

Ana Maria SLANINA, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Department of Preventive Medicine and Interdisciplinarity

Otilia Elena FRASINARIU, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Department of Mother and Child Medicine

Laura Mihaela TRANDAFIR, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Department of Mother and Child Medicine

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Published
2018-12-27
Section
INTERNAL MEDICINE - PEDIATRICS