SERUM LIPOPROTEIN (a) LEVELS IN PATIENTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

  • Corina SERBAN ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Timișoara
  • T. NICOLA ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine & Pharmacy Timișoara
  • Rodica MATEESCU ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine & Pharmacy Timișoara
  • Lavinia NOVEANU ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine & Pharmacy Timișoara
  • Lelia SUSAN ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine & Pharmacy Timișoara
  • Alina PACURARI ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine & Pharmacy Timișoara
  • A. CARABA ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine & Pharmacy Timișoara
  • I. ROMOSAN ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine & Pharmacy Timișoara
  • A. CRISTESCU ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine & Pharmacy Timișoara
Keywords: HYPERTENSION, SERUM LIPOPROTEIN(A), INTIMA-MEDIA THICKNESS, FLOW–MEDIATED VASODILATION

Abstract

Lp(a) is capable of deleteriously altering the balance between the procoagulant
and anticoagulant, proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory, and vasorelaxing and vasoconstricting
properties of the endothelium. Material and method: The purpose of this study was to
investigate the serum concentration of Lp(a) and the main parameters of lipid profile in three
groups of subjects: a control group that included 16 healthy subjects, 20 patients with arterial
hypertension and dyslipidemia and 20 patients with arterial hypertension without dyslipidemia.
Using B-mode ultrasonography, we evaluated carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and flow
mediated vasodilation (FMD) on brachial artery. Results: We found significant higher Lp(a)
concentrations in hypertensive patients with dislipidemia (70±55.95 mg/dL, p<0.001) and in
hypertensive patients without dislipidemia (69±52.33 mg/dL, p<0.001), comparative with the
control group (19±14.64 mg/dL). In hypertensive patients with dislipidemia we found a
strong negative correlation between Lp(a) and carotid IMT (R2 = -0.75, p<0.001) and a
moderate negative correlation between Lp(a) and FMD (R2 = - 0.38, p<0.001). Lp(a) level
wasnt correlated with the main parameters of lipid profile. Conclusions: These results
indicated that serum Lp(a) values could play an important role in essential hypertension
pathogenesis and could be considered as an individual risk factor in hypertensive patients.

Author Biographies

Corina SERBAN, ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Timișoara

School of Medicine
Pathophysiology Department

T. NICOLA, ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine & Pharmacy Timișoara

School of Medicine

Oncology Clinic

Rodica MATEESCU, ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine & Pharmacy Timișoara

School of Medicine

Physiology Department

Lavinia NOVEANU, ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine & Pharmacy Timișoara

School of Medicine

Physiology Department

Lelia SUSAN, ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine & Pharmacy Timișoara

School of Medicine

IVth Medical Clinic

Alina PACURARI, ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine & Pharmacy Timișoara

School of Medicine

IVth Medical Clinic

A. CARABA, ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine & Pharmacy Timișoara

School of Medicine

IVth Medical Clinic

I. ROMOSAN, ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine & Pharmacy Timișoara

School of Medicine

IVth Medical Clinic

A. CRISTESCU, ”V. Babeș” University of Medicine & Pharmacy Timișoara

School of Medicine
Pathophysiology Department

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Published
2019-11-04