BREAST CANCER AND BASAL CELL CARCINOMA IN THE SAME PATIENT - IS IT RANDOM? (CASE SERIES REPORTS)

  • Ioana ARMASU “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Iulia CRUMPEI “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • C. VOLOVAT “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Mariana TOFAN “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Alina Daniela BELCEANU “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Delia CIOBANU “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • M. DANCIU “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Felicia CRUMPEI “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Cristina PREDA “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Carmen VULPOI “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
Keywords: BREAST CANCER, BASAL CELL CARCINOMA, NON-MELANOMA SKIN CANCER, MULTIPLE MALIGNANCIES

Abstract

Non-melanoma skin cancer, including basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas, is the most common cancer affecting white-skinned individuals and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Several studies have reported that individuals diagnosed with non-melanoma skin cancer are at higher risk of subsequent or prior diagnoses of second primary malignancies. We report a series of five cases with concomitant basal cell carcinoma and breast cancer; in two cases the basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed after the breast cancer and in three cases it preceded it. Considering the high frequency and low mortality of basal cell carcinomas, they offer an excellent opportunity to study the factors that put some individuals at increased risk of multiple malignancies.

Author Biographies

Ioana ARMASU, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Medical Specialties (II)

Iulia CRUMPEI, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Medical Specialties (II)

C. VOLOVAT, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Victoria Hospital Iasi

Mariana TOFAN, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Victoria Hospital Iasi

Alina Daniela BELCEANU, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Medical Specialties (II)

Delia CIOBANU, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Morpho-Functional Sciences (I)

M. DANCIU, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Morpho-Functional Sciences (I)

Felicia CRUMPEI, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

“Sf. Spiridon” County Clinical Emergency Hospital Iasi

Cristina PREDA, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Medical Specialties (II)

Carmen VULPOI, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Medical Specialties (II)

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Published
2017-12-22
Section
INTERNAL MEDICINE - PEDIATRICS